The Wall Street Journal Asia Fellowship at NYU

Journalism fellowship at New York University's Business and Economic Reporting program at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute

2014 WALL STREET JOURNAL ASIA FELLOWSHIP AT NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Posted on | January 6, 2014 | Comments Off

HONG KONG (Jan. 6, 2014) – The Wall Street Journal, in association with New York University, is now accepting applications for the 2014 Wall Street Journal Asia Fellowship. The Fellowship provides promising journalists from Asia with the opportunity to participate in the three-semester masters program in the Business & Economic Reporting program at NYU’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute.

The deadline is March 7, 2014. To find out how to apply—what materials to submit, timeline, etc.—click on the “process” tab under “The Important Stuff.”

Candidates must have at least one year’s experience working in Asia at an English-language publication and be fluent in English and at least one Asian language. A team of Journal editors working in conjunction with NYU professors will select one or more fellows for the program.

Entering its ninth year, the Fellowship has enabled a number of working journalists in Asia to come to New York to study journalism at a top research university. The BER program features a unique interdisciplinary curriculum of both journalism and MBA courses. With a low 5:1 student-to-faculty ratio, the program provides intellectual rigor as well as hands-on mentoring for 15 hand-picked students.

The Fellowship covers tuition and fees for two of the three semesters of the program, as well as a stipend of US$24,000 to cover travel to New York, living expenses, at least one trip home, as well as incidental costs such as textbooks. Previous fellows have gone on to staff positions at the Journal and other major news organizations in the U.S. and Asia.

For more information about the program, contact Prof. Adam L. Penenberg, assistant director, Business and Economic Reporting program at NYU: Adam.Penenberg@nyu.edu.

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About Dow Jones

Dow Jones & Company is a global provider of news and business information, delivering content to consumers and organizations via newspapers, Web sites, apps, video, newsletters, magazines, proprietary databases, conferences, and radio. Dow Jones has produced unrivaled quality content for over 120 years and today has one of the world’s largest news-gathering operations with nearly 2,000 journalists in more than 80 bureaus, including The Wall Street Journal, America’s largest newspaper by paid circulation. Other premier brands include Barron’s, MarketWatch, and DJX, its flagship news and analytics platform. Dow Jones publishes in 13 languages and distributes content in 28 languages, combining technology with news and data to support business decision making. The company pioneered the first successful paid online news site and its industry leading innovation enables it to serve customers wherever they may be, via the Web, mobile devices, Internet-connected televisions, and tablets.

For more information please visit: http://www.dowjones.com/

Media contact: 

Paula Fisher / Linde Wolters
Ogilvy PR
+852 2884 8518 / +852 2884 8656
Paula.Fisher@ogilvy.com / Linde.Wolters@ogilvy.com

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WINNER OF THE 2013 WALL STREET JOURNAL ASIA FELLOWSHIP ANNOUNCED

Posted on | September 4, 2013 | Comments Off

NEW YORK (June 13, 2013) – The winner of the 2013 Wall Street Journal Asia Fellowship is Srividya Kalyanaraman, a Senior Web Producer at Firstpost in India.

The fellowship provides promising mid-career journalists from Asia the opportunity to participate in the three-semester master of arts program in the Business and Economic Reporting at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. In its tenth year, the fellowship is supported by the Dow Jones Foundation and NYU.

Ms. Kalyanaraman worked at Firstpost, India’s first digital-only news product, since 2012. As Senior Web Producer, she worked at the business desk tracking stock markets and reporting on venture capital and entrepreneurship.

Ms. Kalyanaraman earned her Post Graduate Diploma in Print Journalism from Asian College of Journalism, Chennai in 2010 and Bachelors in Mass Media with a specialization in Journalism at SIES College, Mumbai, India in 2009.

After graduate school, she worked for The Economic Times, world’s second-largest English financial daily, as a technology correspondent for two years and also covered startups and venture capital investments.

The fellowship covers tuition and fees for two of the three semesters of the program, as well as a stipend to cover travel to New York and other expenses. Previous fellows have gone on to staff positions covering business and economics at The Wall Street Journal and other major news organizations in the U.S. and Asia.

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2013 WALL STREET JOURNAL ASIA FELLOWSHIP AT NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Posted on | February 12, 2013 | Comments Off

HONG KONG (Feb. 21, 2013) – The Wall Street Journal, in association with New York University, is now accepting applications for the 2013 Wall Street Journal Asia Fellowship. The Fellowship provides promising journalists from Asia with the opportunity to participate in the three-semester masters program in the Business & Economic Reporting program at NYU’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute.

The deadline is March 29, 2013. To find out how to apply–what materials to submit, timeline, etc.–click on the “process” tab under “The Important Stuff.”

Candidates must have at least one year’s experience working in Asia at an English-language publication and be fluent in English and at least one Asian language. A team of Journal editors working in conjunction with NYU professors will select one or more fellows for the program.

Entering its ninth year, the Fellowship has enabled a number of working journalists in Asia to come to New York to study journalism at a top research university. The BER program features a unique interdisciplinary curriculum of both journalism and MBA courses. With a low 5:1 student-to-faculty ratio, the program provides intellectual rigor as well as hands-on mentoring for 15 hand-picked students.

The Fellowship covers tuition and fees for two of the three semesters of the program, as well as a stipend of US$24,000 to cover travel to New York, living expenses, at least one trip home, as well as incidental costs such as textbooks. Previous fellows have gone on to staff positions at the Journal and other major news organizations in the U.S. and Asia.

For more information about the program, contact: Prof. Adam L. Penenberg, assistant director, Business and Economic Reporting program at NYU at Adam.Penenberg@nyu.edu

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About Dow Jones

Dow Jones & Company is a global provider of news and business information, delivering content to consumers and organizations via newspapers, Web sites, apps, newsletters, magazines, proprietary databases, conferences, radio and video. Dow Jones has produced unrivalled quality content for over 100 years and today has one of the world’s largest news-gathering operations with 2,000 journalists in more than 50 countries, including The Wall Street Journal, the nation’s largest newspaper by total paid circulation. Other premier brands include Barron’s, MarketWatch, Factiva, Dow Jones Risk & Compliance, Dow Jones VentureSource, and All Things D. Its information services publish in 11 languages and distribute content in 28 languages, combining technology with news and data to support business decision making. The company pioneered the first successful paid online news site and its industry leading innovation enables it to serve customers wherever they may be, via the Web, mobile devices and tablets.

For more information please visit: http://www.dowjones.com/

Media contact: 

Kate Dobbin
Dow Jones
+44 20 7573 4016
kate.dobbin@dowjones.com

 

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Winner of 2012 Wall Street Journal Asia Fellowship Announced

Posted on | October 23, 2012 | Comments Off

NEW YORK (June 13, 2012) – The winner of the 2012 Wall Street Journal Asia Fellowship is Sarah Jacob, a correspondent for The Economic Times of India.

The fellowship provides promising mid-career journalists from Asia the opportunity to participate in the three-semester master of arts program in the Business and Economic Reporting at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. In its ninth year, the fellowship is supported by the Dow Jones Foundation and NYU.

Ms. Jacob worked at The Economic Times, the world’s second-largest English business daily, since 2008.  As Principal Correspondent, she reported on trends, joint ventures, capital formation and policy decisions across retail, consumer goods and spirits sectors in India. She was named The Economic Times’ best young journalist in 2011. 

Ms. Jacob earned her Post Graduate Diploma in Print Journalism from Asian College of Journalism, Chennai in 2008 and B.A in Economics at St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai, India in 2007.

The fellowship covers tuition and fees for two of the three semesters of the program, as well as a stipend to cover travel to New York and other expenses.

Previous fellows have gone on to staff positions covering business and economics at The Wall Street Journal and other major news organizations in the U.S. and Asia.

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2012 Wall Street Journal Asia Fellowship at New York University

Posted on | February 24, 2012 | Comments Off

NEW YORK (Feb. 21, 2012) – The Wall Street Journal, in association with New York University, is now accepting applications for the 2012 Wall Street Journal Asia Fellowship. The Fellowship provides promising journalists from Asia with the opportunity to participate in the three-semester masters program in the Business & Economic Reporting program at NYU’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute.

The deadline is March 28, 2012. (Note: We extended it an additional week.)

Candidates must have at least one year’s experience working in Asia at an English-language publication and be fluent in English and at least one Asian language. A team of Journal editors working in conjunction with NYU professors will select one or more fellows for the program.

Entering its ninth year, the Fellowship has enabled a number of working journalists in Asia to come to New York to study journalism at a top research university. The BER program features a unique interdisciplinary curriculum of both journalism and MBA courses. With a low 5:1 student-to-faculty ratio, the program provides intellectual rigor as well as hands-on mentoring for 15 hand-picked students.

The Fellowship covers tuition and fees for two of the three semesters of the program, as well as a stipend of US$22,000 to cover travel to New York, living expenses, at least one trip home, as well as incidental costs such as textbooks. Previous fellows have gone on to staff positions at the Journal and other major news organizations in the U.S. and Asia.

For more information about the program, contact: Prof. Adam Penenberg, assistant director, Business and Economic Reporting program at NYU at Adam.Penenberg@nyu.edu

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ABOUT DOW JONES

Dow Jones & Company is a global provider of news and business information and a developer of technology to deliver content to consumers and organizations across multiple platforms. Dow Jones produces newspapers, newswires, Web sites, apps, newsletters, magazines, proprietary databases, conferences, radio and video.  Its premier brands include The Wall Street Journal, Dow Jones Newswires, Factiva, Barron’s, MarketWatch, SmartMoney and All Things D. Its information services combine technology with news and data to support business decision-making. The company pioneered the first successful paid online news site, and its industry-leading innovation enables it to serve customers wherever they might be, via the Web, mobile devices and tablets. The Dow Jones Local Media Group publishes community newspapers, Web sites and other products in six U.S. states. Dow Jones & Company (www.dowjones.com) is a News Corporation company (NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA; ASX: NWS, NWSLV; www.newscorp.com).

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Winner of 2011 Wall Street Journal Asia Fellowship Announced

Posted on | June 14, 2011 | Comments Off

imageNEW YORK (June 13, 2011) – The Wall Street Journal announced today the winner of the 2011 Wall Street Journal Asia Fellowship is Warangkana Chomchuen, a television producer from Chiang Rai in northern Thailand.

The fellowship provides promising mid-career journalists from Asia the opportunity to participate in the three-semester master of arts program in the Business and Economic Reporting at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. In its eighth year, the fellowship is supported by the Dow Jones Foundation and NYU.

Ms. Chomchuen has worked as a production coordinator in the Bangkok bureau of NBC News since 2007. While with NBC News, Ms. Chomchuen, who aspires to be a cross-platform business journalist, has produced major news stories and a variety of features from the field for NBC’s Nightly News, the Today Show and MSNBC.com. Among other high-profile assignments, she was involved in the live broadcast of the Today Show’s ‘Where in the World is Matt Lauer’ in Laos in 2008; CNBC’s coverage of the G20 summit 2010 in Seoul; and the Today Show’s interview with Aung San Suu Kyi in Yangon, Myanmar, in 2011.

Ms. Chomchuen graduated with honors in English from Chulalongkorn University and won a Fulbright Scholarship to study at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism from 2006 to 2007.

The Wall Street Journal fellowship covers tuition and fees for two of the three semesters of the program, as well as a stipend to cover travel to New York and other expenses.

Previous fellows have gone on to staff positions covering business and economics at The Wall Street Journal and other major news organizations in the U.S. and Asia.

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Applications for 2011 Closed

Posted on | March 23, 2011 | Comments Off

Thanks to everyone for applying. Applications are now closed and finalists will be contacted directly. For those of you who did not manage to apply in time, I recommend subscribing to the RSS feed and applying next year. Dates vary, so I can’t give a precise date on when applications will open.

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A Fellow’s FAQ

Posted on | February 23, 2011 | Comments Off

From Sui-Lee in response to some of our questions about the  fellowship:

How did you hear about the fellowship?

A friend had sent me an email asking me to apply.

Why did you apply? What were your objectives?

I wanted to become more of a specialist in reporting on financial news and I thought the MBA courses would be particularly helpful in that aspect.

How long did it take you to complete your application?

I took about three days.What advice would you offer applicants about completing their application?

I think it’s important to really work on the essay and make sure your passion for the profession shines through, and to also provide concrete examples of how he or she would make a difference to journalism if given the fellowship.

What was the hardest part of the application process for you? What pitfalls should applicants look out for?

The most difficult part was crafting the essay and structuring my thoughts. Applicants should also make sure that they send in clips that truly involve enterprise reporting – those articles would help them stand out from the crowd.

How easy was it to leave your existing job? Did you leave in place any arrangement or option to return?

It was easy because I was young then. No, there was no arrangement to return, although I was lucky that Reuters hired me again.

What preparations did you make for the fellowship after being accepted?

I spoke to all the previous fellows before me to ask for tips on the course and life in New York.

Did you have a goal for after the fellowship? Did you know what you were going to do?

I wanted to be hired with an international media organization.

What did you wish you’d prepared better, looking back?

Nothing, really.

How easy was it to get settled in New York? What advice would you offer?

Plow through housing ads on Craigslist to get a sense of rents in the city, talk to previous alumni, attend all social events.

What did you find best about the course?

The courses at NYU’s Stern School of Business,the journalism professors who provided real-world experience, the talks by top editors from international media organizations.

What would you differently in the course, looking back?

Nothing.

Any advice on the course itself?

Work hard, be open-minded to suggestions and enjoy yourself!

How easy was it to find a job after the course?

I was fortunate to bump into my former editor, who told me to apply for a job in Hong Kong.

What is your present job, exactly?

I cover politics and general news in China for Reuters.

Why are you doing the job you’re doing now? How has the fellowship helped, if at all, in getting you there?

This is my dream job. The fellowship has equipped me with the financial knowledge to understand political risk and the interaction of government, the economy and businesses.

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Goals Post Fellowship

Posted on | February 22, 2011 | Comments Off

Succesful applicants were asked what their plans were upon completion of their fellowship.

Serena Ng: I didn’t know what the fellowship would lead to, but I was well aware that there was no guarantee of a job at Dow Jones or the WSJ after the program. I also knew the bar to get into the WSJ (and any other major media organization in the U.S.) was extremely high, and the standards of journalism weren’t the same as the local paper I worked for. I did hope, however, that I would be able to get a job in the U.S. after graduating from NYU, either at a wire service or a newspaper here.

Saabira Chaudhuri: To hone my writing/reporting/research/interviewing skills on the one hand, and also develop a base of business/economics/finance knowledge on the other. I also thought about what sorts of internships I might want to apply for over the course of the semester and the summer in order to supplement (rather than replicate) any existing work experience I had.

Nesil Staney: Yes, to become a Journal reporter. Cover Wall Street.

Eva Woo: A financial journalist. which is what i am now.

Warangkana Chomchuen:  After I did my internships and finished the program, I knew pretty much what kind of business journalism I wanted to do and what I would rather not do. Keeping this in mind helped me narrow down my job hunting and keep things a bit more focused. 

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The Wisdom of Hindsight

Posted on | February 21, 2011 | Comments Off

Applicants were asked what things they would have prepared more.

Serena Ng: There are very few things I would have done differently–because it was the first year of the fellowship, I think it helped that I didn’t have unrealistic expectations about it could lead to, and simply followed my instincts throughout the experience.

Nesil Staney: I should have prepared for the school earlier.

Eva Woo: Study harder on how to write as a non-native speaker.

Warangkana Chomchuen:  I would have started preparing myself for school a bit earlier. I did follow business news and listened to economic podcast, which was helpful, but I wish I spent some time studying some economic and finance concepts that are difficult to understand.

 

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